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‘Weird’ Al Yankovic’s New Album is Insult Comedy Gold

Posted by: on Jul 15, 2014 | Comments (0)

“Weird” Al Yankovic is turning into a fantastic insult comic.

He has released two videos so far from his latest album, “Mandatory Fun,” and aside from being spot-on parodies of two of the most popular songs of the year, they are beautifully dickish in an inarguable way.

“Tacky,” a riff on Pharrell’s “Happy,” highlights the terrible fashion trends of Crocs, stripes and plaid, and the idea of taking selfies with the deceased at a funeral. The video features several comedians, mostly notably Jack Black, who is tacky defined with his high-waisted pants, rhinestoned fanny pack and obsessive twerking. It does such a good job of pointing out the stupidity of all these actions and looks, that anyone finding themselves associated with anything mentioned in the song should feel immediate and extreme shame. Then never do that thing again.

“Word Crimes,” a take on Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines,” is basically Yankovic being a grammar Nazi. Dangling participles and contractions aside, he belittles those who use numbers for letters and single letters for full words (unless you’re Prince). It’s sweet release for that inner word cop that wants to spring out and beat the mob of uneducated slobs senseless with their own words. Yankovic has saved us much embarrassment and heartache.

The videos are part of his 8 videos in 8 days project, which in itself is a riff on Beyoncé’s latest release. Bey put out an album of 15 songs and 17 music videos available only on iTunes in December, with complete secrecy before its release. It sold a million copies in less than a week. Yankovic will release a full album in physical form, but has hinted that this album, the last under his current record contract, might signal a change. He says on his blog that he’s “weighing his options.”

Here’s hoping those options include a deeper delve into insult comedy.we

Trebuchet Recording New Album

Trebuchet Recording New Album

Posted by: on Jul 2, 2013 | Comments (0)

Paul Haile of Trebuchet

Trebuchet, one of Sonoma County’s most wonderful bands, is recording a followup to their self-titled debut album. Hopefully, this one will be filled with just as much reflective storytelling and beautiful vocal harmonies as their first effort. The 10-song full-length record will hopefully be released in the fall, says drummer and recording engineer Paul Haile, who was recording drum tracks in Santa Rosa today with bassist and guitarist Navid Manoochehri. Judging by the drum tracks, it sounds like this album will feature a larger sound, maybe with more punch and, if possible, even more emotion than the previous one.

It’s also supposed to hit 97 degrees today, so maybe the tracks recorded later in the day will be more subdued.

On the Stereo: Four Tet 'There is Love in You'

Posted by: on Jan 20, 2010 | Comments (0)

Retro “pause tape” edit as intro—words from different sources spliced into a coherent sentence, like three kinds of adhesive tape used to wrap a Cartier bracelet. “Therrr es Love n Oooyou.” So far, much different than “A Joy,” the leadoff from Everything Ecstatic, and thus welcome. No one would file this in ‘Electronica.’

Rubbing it in: the sound of R2D2. Take that, Krohn. Processed hi-hats essential for that “chase scene” feel. Slow build with dope rubber-band bass, vocal loop fading, snares popping in to check on the bird just when you’d forgotten. Ways to get lost to the third power.

Would be hard to peg this as Four Tet until it starts harping on me, vintage Hebden. Taking the candy away as soon as it’s spiraled around the lips. How does one gate a synth? Suddenly I realize that the whole picture isn’t a picture. Match the edges first, then fill in the field. Coffee table’s out of commission for weeks.

If the pleasure of something is in its anticipation, and one is in control of crafting their desires, the world should theoretically be a wellspring of happiness instead of an assemblage of threshing machines ready to chew up the next mystery.

A slightly more pensive Four Tet, this one. I approve.