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John Prine Explains ‘Bruised Orange’

John Prine Explains ‘Bruised Orange’

Posted by: on Feb 18, 2012 | Comments (0)

He’s one of the great singer-storytellers, and yet I’d never heard John Prine’s personal explanation of “Bruised Orange (Chain of Sorrow)” until coming across this clip from 1980, below. Watch as he drives around his old hometown, describing his job at a church, telling the story of the morning when one of the altar boys was hit by a train and pointing out all of the song’s landmarks:

“Like a long ago Sunday when I walked through… this alley, over here. On a cold winter’s morning.. to that churchhouse. Just to shovel some snow… off that sidewalk. An’ I heard sirens on that train track, over there.”

(The clip is from John Prine Live on Soundstage 1980, from Shout Factory.)

I’ve just spent the last 45 minutes on Google Maps trying to find this very church referenced above, with no luck. Prine grew up in Maywood, Ill., and the main train tracks in town run along S. 25th Ave, with some others along Main Street. Prine calls them the “Northwestern tracks.” Those are the clues. Let’s consider it one of those Andrew Sullivan “View From Your Window” contests—if you can find the church (here’s a starter), let me know.

(UPDATE: CSI pal Jake Bayless has found it! It’s the New Beginnings Christian Church at 205 S. Fifth Ave., in Maywood, about a block away from the tracks. See a Google Street View here. Thanks, Jake!)

Picking a favorite John Prine song is impossible, but when I met John Prine, once, about ten years ago, I was awkward and nervous as I explained to him that “Bruised Orange” had helped me through some very tumultuous times. I think I even quoted some lyrics back to him: “A heart stained in anger grows weak and grows bitter.” Like he needed to hear them. But he was kind, and told me he was glad to have lent a hand.

Naturally, I’m not the only one touched by the song and its story. While writing this post, I’ve discovered that Bon Iver has recorded a version of “Bruised Orange.” It’s reverent and soaring, of course. Hear it here.

 

 

 

 

John Prine to play the Wells Fargo Center on April 11

Posted by: on Jan 25, 2010 | Comments (0)

John Prine, the lovable songwriter who deserves every laurel thrown at his feet, is coming back to Santa Rosa to play the Wells Fargo Center on April 11, 2010.

Presale tickets are available now by clicking here, although take note of the strange rules if you pursue this option: “Seats will be assigned at random on the day of the show, and the location of your seats will not be known until tickets are picked up at will call.”

For those who want the peace of mind of knowing where they’re sitting, tickets to the general public go on sale this Friday, Jan. 29, at noon.

The last time John Prine played in Santa Rosa, it was September 8, 2001. The twin towers still stood, as did the feeling of optimism and confidence in the economy. The venue was still called the Luther Burbank Center. We had the luxury of being able to laugh at his songs then; something tells me those same songs might cause a tinge of sadness now. He played for over two hours that night, just song after brilliant song, ending with an encore of “Paradise” joined onstage by Todd Snider. “Lake Marie” brought the house down, and he made beautiful chestnuts like “Souvenirs,” “Sam Stone” and “You Got Gold” sound shiny and new after all these years. I talked to him afterwards; he was all rosy cheeks, in a great mood, and told me the crowd was as great and responsive as any he’d played for. It was a hell of a show.

If you’ve never seen John Prine, you’re missing out on a genuine national treasure. The standing-room deal is $19.50, with tickets going up to $39.50 and $49.50 for seats. It’ll sell out easily. For more info., call 707.546.3600 or visit the Wells Fargo Center site.

The Magnetic Fields' '69 Love Songs' Coming on 6×10" Vinyl Box Set

Posted by: on May 20, 2009 | Comments (1)

Well, it only took them ten years, but we take such news when we can get it!

The Magnetic Fields’ brilliant song cycle 69 Love Songs is finally seeing a vinyl release. Spread across six 10″ records, each in a separate gatefold sleeve, the set will be bound with a cardboard slipcover and a large version of the CD version booklet. It should be out sometime in August April 20, 2010, it’s apparently limited to 3,000 copies, and it’ll cost about $100.

I’ve had a running list of albums that should be on vinyl going for quite some time, and 69 Love Songs has been right up near the top since its release ten years ago. Most record companies in 1999 didn’t see any benefit to releasing vinyl, although Merge Records has always been great about LPs—they even pioneered the LP+mp3 download coupon idea, which I covered pretty extensively here last year. Now if they could just release Crooked Fingers’ Red Devil Dawn on vinyl, we’d be set!

There’s a whole lotta other dream albums out there that would be released on vinyl if there were any sense of justice in the world. Here’s a few from the ongoing wish list. Feel free to add your own suggestions in the comments below.

Please, Record Industry: Put These Albums Out on Vinyl!


Lucinda Williams – Car Wheels on a Gravel Road

 


The Boredoms – Seadrum / House of Sun

 


Los Lobos – Colossal Head

 


K’naan – The Dusty Foot Philosopher

 


John Prine – In Spite of Ourselves

 


James Carter – Chasin’ the Gypsy

 


Gillian Welch – Time (the Revelator)

 


The Velvet Teen – Out of the Fierce Parade

 


Uncle Tupelo – Anodyne

 


Smoking Popes – Born to Quit

 


Arvo Pärt – Alina

 


Steve Earle – Transcendental Blues

 


Camille – Le Fil

 


Nellie McKay – Get Away From Me

 


The Rentals – Seven More Minutes

 


Don Byron – Ivey Divey

 


Greg Brown – Over and Under

 


Bebo & Cigala – Lagrimas Negras

 


Old 97’s – Too Far to Care

 


Wynton Marsalis – Live at the House of Tribes

 


Robert Earl Keen – Gravitational Forces

 


Knife in the Water – Soundtrack