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Live Review: Treasure Island Music Festival 2013

Posted by on Oct 21, 2013 | Comments (2)

View from the Ferris Wheel on Treasure Island


Treasure Island Music Festival is more than just music, it’s an experience. The festival is so well produced that it wouldn’t be difficult to have a good time having never heard of any of the bands playing. The seventh incarnation of the two-day festival wrapped up yesterday, and it was another beaming success. In addition to music, there is a shopping area, arts and crafts tent, zine and comic library, silent disco (live DJ spinning for wireless headphone-wearing listeners), food trucks, a Ferris wheel, bubbles and the best people watching money can buy. Wow, that last part sounded creepy, but you get the idea.

But there’s also music—lots of it. Each stage is timed down to the minute, so there is never a dull moment. There’s also never a moment to let the ears relax, and the only booth with earplugs was selling them for a buck a pair. Note for next year, guys: GIVE AWAY FREE EARPLUGS.

I’ve listed some favorites and least favorites, not based on the quality of their set (I’m sure there are fans of the bands who might think it was the band’s best performance ever), but on entertainment quality from an outside perspective. I must stress that even what I found to be the most banal of musical performances still turned out to be quite entertaining.

Saturday’s Favorites

Atoms For Peace

Atoms For Peace: 4.5/5 Incredible texture from this group of musically sensitive players, with Flea leading the charge via driving, lead-focused bass guitar. Felt almost like a post rock version of Radiohead with Flea on bass (he is his own adjective). Very cold weather led to most people leaving before the end of the second encore (myself included), which is a shame since that’s when they played the Thom Yorke song “Black Swan,” arguably the best from his solo album.

Little Dragon: 3.5/5 Good stage presence and real instruments made this a highlight on a day of laptop-driven DJ tunes and pumping bass. Singer Yukimi Nagano flows musically and visually as the leader of this electronic music group. They split the difference with a live drummer playing an electronic drum kit.

Danny Brown

Danny Brown: 3.5/5 Once the sound engineer figured out how to properly mix rap vocals (it took a couple songs), Danny Brown’s nasally, violent delivery emerged and piqued the ears of festivalgoers that might not have come specifically to see the last-minute replacement for Tricky. The early performance was a good boost of live human energy to contrast the repetitive bass and synthesizer drum sounds the rest of the day had in store.

Saturday’s Least Favorites

Major Lazer

Major Lazer: 2/5 About 20 minutes into the set, we figured out that Major Lazer is actually just a group of hype men. There are no real instruments, no actual music being made. The three dudes in suits trade off turns at the elevated laptop station at the back of the stage, but there was no singing no playing of anything. Just guys on wireless mics yelling at everyone to jump and put their hands up. By the end of the set everyone was so tired they chose to be berated for not following directions rather than expend one more joule of energy on this choreographed high school dance.

Disclosure: 2/5 In haiku: such low energy / could not keep my eyes open / what was that you said?

Sunday’s Favorites
STRFKR: 4.5/5 Not surprised that this electro-indie group was top notch, but surprised at how well their albums translated to live performance. They know their music is, at times, slow to develop. But they spruce up the show with visuals, like two dudes in padded sumo suits going at it for a couple tunes. They even played along with the bits, and it didn’t sacrifice the quality of the music.

James Blake: 4/5 Great soundtrack for the day shifting gears into cold night. Focused songs had energy in their own way, giving a nice break from nonstop dancing. Blake is an excellent performer whose passion is evident when he plays. His songs feature piano and good songwriting, a timeless, classic combination.

Haim

Haim: 4/5 Wow. These girls rocked harder than anyone at the festival. The three sisters and their male drummer had a sound reminiscent of Prince, during his more rocking moments, and even captured some funk to go with it. Their “girl power” shtick was a little heavy at times, like when they spoke at length how they now know what Beyonce feels like when the wind blows hair into their mouths, and when they squealed with delight when handed candy from the crowd. But I’m not a young girl, so maybe it was indeed the perfect concert set for their target audience. Either way, it was impressive.

Sunday’s least favorites:
Animal Collective: 1.5/5 Sometimes art is so conceptual that it goes over my head. I was hoping this was the case with Animal Collective, and at one point I actually asked a friend if they knew what the point was supposed to be. Nobody knew. I’m not sure Animal Collective knew. A very cool stage set (inflatable teeth with individual projections made the stage look like a gigantic open mouth) and light show helped slightly, but the music was so repetitive and the melodies so simply and leading nowhere that I left to watch football about two-thirds of the way through. I still heard the music (it was impossible not to from anywhere on the island, really), and still was not impressed.

Beck. Still going after all these years. Still good, pretty much the same as the last time you saw him.


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2 comments

  1. colin
    October 21, 2013

    what was beck’s score? is he too established for u to talk shit about?

    Reply
  2. Kara
    October 22, 2013

    Great recap. FYI, they did have free earplugs available at the First Aid tent. I’ve seen this at Shoreline too. Tipping is optional and they also provide other essentials like sunscreen.

    Reply

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